Django Unchained: Slavery in the West

DJANGO UNCHAINED

Before I get to the review, please take the time to check out my other site The Electron Pub @ theelectronpub.wordpress.com. I’m working towards my bar tending license, so here is where I post reviews of drinks, recipes, and eventually some instructional videos.

TITLE: DJANGO UNCHAINED

DIRECTOR: Quentin Tarentino

YEAR: 2012

COUNTRY: United States

Oh, Django Unchained, how I wish that I did not wait so long to finally watch you. I had completely forgotten about Django Unchained upon its initial release, but on a random trip to Redbox I decided to pick it up. Already embarrassed to call myself a Tarentino fan since I had not seen the film, I pressed play and was intrigued by the start. I am so happy that I didn’t pass over the film completely.

Django Unchained follows the adventures of Dr. King Schultz, a dentist turned bounty hunter (Christoph Waltz) and Django, a freed slave (Jamie Foxx). They becoming bounty hunting partners and eventually team together to find Django’s wife Broomhilda (Kerry Washington). This leads them on some interesting adventures, clashing with slave owner Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his head of house slave Stephan (Samuel L Jackson).

I have to say, there are so many things right with this film that it is hard to just pick a few to talk about. I do have to point out that Django Unchained would not have been so successful if the characters weren’t so god damn awesome! Christoph Waltz and Jamie Foxx do amazing jobs at bringing the different cultures and mannerisms of their characters that they are just to damn entertaining the watch. The story of the film is absolutely riveting as well, I was so interested in the film that the almost three hours flew by. Another cool tidbit is that Django Unchained is actually a remake of the classic western film Django. The original star of Django (Franco Nero) makes a cameo in the film during one of the most memorable lines.

Foxx: “My name is Django.”

Nero: “How do you spell it?”

Foxx: “D_j_a_n_g_o. The D is silent.”

Nero: *chuckles* “I know.”

     Alright, now to get to the fun part of the review. The major issue I have with Django Unchained is that they use n****r and its variations a little to much.  If you don’t like the use of n****r and its other variations, then you might have a problem with this film.  I have a few friends that absolutely hate the word and are unable to watch Django Unchained because of it. It is very disappointing since the film is quite good. While I don’t have a problem with the word and I know it is supposed to add authenticity and make the characters feel “more real”, so in my opinion it contributed to the film largely. Let’s just say though, the word n****r and its variations are used about 110 times throughout the film.

Not to mention Leonardo DiCaprio’s racist skull speech.

PROS:

  • Hilarious relationship between characters.
  • Great dialogue.
  • Great combination of genres.
  • Leonardo DiCaprio at his finest.

CONS:

  • The use of the n-word may bother some viewers.
  • Why can’t minions or lesser villains shoot accurately?
  • Ridiculously violent, but what do your expect from Tarentino?
  • The film is quite lengthy.

SCORE: 9.5 / 10

If you have any suggestions for films/TV/Games/Music for me to review, drop me a comment!

Remember:

Like Media In Review @ https://www.facebook.com/MediaInReview?ref=hl

Follow Media in Review @ https://twitter.com/Media_In_Review

Stay tuned for the new you tube channel!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Django Unchained: Slavery in the West

  1. Just a great movie, that, no matter how long it went on for, always kept me excited and wondering what was going to occur next. Good review.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s